Gas-Phase Spectra of MgO Molecules: A Possible Connection from Gas-Phase Molecules to Planet Formation [EPA]

http://arxiv.org/abs/1711.03544


A more fine-tuned method for probing planet-forming regions, such as protoplanetary discs, could be rovibrational molecular spectroscopy observation of particular premineral molecules instead of more common but ultimately less related volatile organic compounds. Planets are created when grains aggregate, but how molecules form grains is an ongoing topic of discussion in astrophysics and planetary science. Using the spectroscopic data of molecules specifically involved in mineral formation could help to map regions where planet formation is believed to be occurring in order to examine the interplay between gas and dust. Four atoms are frequently associated with planetary formation: Fe, Si, Mg, and O. Magnesium, in particular, has been shown to be in higher relative abundance in planet-hosting stars. Magnesium oxide crystals comprise the mineral periclase making it the chemically simplest magnesium-bearing mineral and a natural choice for analysis. The monomer, dimer, and trimer forms of (MgO)_n with n = 1 – 3 are analyzed in this work using high-level quantum chemical computations known to produce accurate results. Strong vibrational transitions at 12.5 {\mu}m, 15.0 {\mu}m, and 16.5 {\mu}m are indicative of magnesium oxide monomer, dimer, and trimer making these wavelengths of particular interest for the observation of protoplanetary discs and even potentially planet-forming regions around stars. If such transitions are observed in emission from the accretion discs or absorptions from stellar spectra, the beginning stages of mineral and, subsequently, rocky body formation could be indicated.

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K. Kloska and R. Fortenberry
Mon, 13 Nov 17
16/46

Comments: 10 pages, 2 figures, 6 tables, Accepted in MNRAS

Gas-Phase Spectra of MgO Molecules: A Possible Connection from Gas-Phase Molecules to Planet Formation [EPA]

http://arxiv.org/abs/1711.03544


A more fine-tuned method for probing planet-forming regions, such as protoplanetary discs, could be rovibrational molecular spectroscopy observation of particular premineral molecules instead of more common but ultimately less related volatile organic compounds. Planets are created when grains aggregate, but how molecules form grains is an ongoing topic of discussion in astrophysics and planetary science. Using the spectroscopic data of molecules specifically involved in mineral formation could help to map regions where planet formation is believed to be occurring in order to examine the interplay between gas and dust. Four atoms are frequently associated with planetary formation: Fe, Si, Mg, and O. Magnesium, in particular, has been shown to be in higher relative abundance in planet-hosting stars. Magnesium oxide crystals comprise the mineral periclase making it the chemically simplest magnesium-bearing mineral and a natural choice for analysis. The monomer, dimer, and trimer forms of (MgO)_n with n = 1 – 3 are analyzed in this work using high-level quantum chemical computations known to produce accurate results. Strong vibrational transitions at 12.5 {\mu}m, 15.0 {\mu}m, and 16.5 {\mu}m are indicative of magnesium oxide monomer, dimer, and trimer making these wavelengths of particular interest for the observation of protoplanetary discs and even potentially planet-forming regions around stars. If such transitions are observed in emission from the accretion discs or absorptions from stellar spectra, the beginning stages of mineral and, subsequently, rocky body formation could be indicated.

Read this paper on arXiv…

K. Kloska and R. Fortenberry
Mon, 13 Nov 17
22/46

Comments: 10 pages, 2 figures, 6 tables, Accepted in MNRAS

The Interstellar Formation and Spectra of the Noble Gas, Proton-Bound HeHHe+, HeHNe+, & HeHAr+ Complexes [CL]

http://arxiv.org/abs/1711.03344


The sheer interstellar abundance of helium makes any bound molecules or complexes containing it of potential interest for astrophysical observation. This work utilizes high-level and trusted quantum chemical techniques to predict the rotational, vibrational, and rovibrational traits of HeHHe+, HeHNe+, and HeHAr+. The first two are shown to be strongly bound, while HeHAr+ is shown to be more of a van der Waals complex of argonium with a helium atom. In any case, the formation of HeHHe+ through reactions of HeH+ with HeH3+ is exothermic. HeHHe+ exhibits the quintessentially bright proton-shuttle motion present in all proton-bound complexes in the 7.4 micron range making it a possible target for telescopic observation at the mid-IR/far-IR crossover point and a possible tracer for the as-of-yet unobserved helium hydride cation. Furthermore, a similar mode in HeHNe+ can be observed to the blue of this close to 6.9 microns. The brightest mode of HeHAr+ is dimmed due the reduced interaction of the helium atom with the central proton, but this fundamental frequency can be found slightly to the red of the Ar-H stretch in the astrophysically detected argonium cation.

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C. Stephan and R. Fortenberry
Fri, 10 Nov 17
9/55

Comments: 9 pages, 8 tables

Fragmentation of Fullerenes to Linear Carbon Chains [CL]

http://arxiv.org/abs/1709.00317


Small cationic fullerene fragments, produced by electron impact ionization of C60, were mass-selected and accumulated in cryogenic Ne matrixes. Optical absorption spectroscopy of these fragments with up to 18 carbon atoms revealed linear structures. Considering the recent discovery of fullerenes in Space and the very strong absorptions of long linear carbon clusters both in the UV-Vis and IR spectral regions, these systems are good candidates to be observed in Space. We present laboratory data, supported by quantum-chemical calculations and discuss the relevance of long carbon chains for astronomy.

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D. Strelnikov, M. Link and M. Kappes
Mon, 4 Sep 17
55/61

Comments: 16 pages, 10 figures

Millimeter and Submillimeter Wave Spectroscopy of Propanal [SSA]

http://arxiv.org/abs/1707.02148


The rotational spectra of the two stable conformers syn- and gauche-propanal (CH3CH2CHO) were studied in the millimeter and submillimeter wave regions from 75 to 500 GHz with the Cologne (Sub-)Millimeter wave Spectrometer. Furthermore, the first excited states associated with the aldehyde torsion and with the methyl torsion, respectively, of the syn-conformer were analyzed. The newly obtained spectroscopic parameters yield better predictions, thus fulfill sensitivity and resolution requirements in new astronomical observations in order to unambiguously assign pure rotational transitions of propanal. This is demonstrated on a radio astronomical spectrum from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array Protostellar Interferometric Line Survey (ALMA-PILS). In particular, an accurate description of observed splittings, caused by internal rotation of the methyl group in the syn-conformer and by tunneling rotation interaction from two stable degenerate gauche-conformers, is reported. The rotational spectrum of propanal is of additional interest because of its two large amplitude motions pertaining to the methyl and the aldehyde group, respectively.

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O. Zingsheim, H. Muller, F. Lewen, et. al.
Mon, 10 Jul 17
33/64

Comments: 8 pages, J. Mol. Spectrosc., accepted

Photon emission and atomic collision processes in two-phase argon doped with xenon and nitrogen [CL]

http://arxiv.org/abs/1702.03612


We present a comprehensive analysis of photon emission and atomic collision processes in two-phase argon doped with xenon and nitrogen. The dopants are aimed to convert the VUV emission of pure Ar to the UV emission of the Xe dopant in the liquid phase and to the near UV emission of the N2 dopant in the gas phase. Such a mixture is relevant to two-phase dark matter and low energy neutrino detectors, with enhanced photon collection efficiency for primary and secondary scintillation signals. Based on this analysis, we show that the recently proposed hypothesis of the enhancement of the excitation transfer from Ar to N2 species in the two-phase mode is either incorrect or needs assumption about a new extreme mechanism of excitation transfer coming into force at lower temperatures, in particular that of the resonant excitation transfer via ArN2 compound (van der Waals molecule).

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A. Buzulutskov
Tue, 14 Feb 17
19/71

Comments: 6 pages, 1 figure, 1 table

Photo-stability of super-hydrogenated PAHs determined by action spectroscopy experiments [GA]

http://arxiv.org/abs/1609.04264


We have investigated the photo-stability of pristine and super-hydrogenated pyrene cations C$_{16}$H$_{10+m}^+, m = 0,6, \mathrm{\ or\ } 16$) by means of gas-phase action spectroscopy. Optical absorption spectra and photo-induced dissociation mass spectra are presented. By measuring the yield of mass-selected photo-fragment ions as a function of laser pulse intensity, the number of photons (and hence the energy) needed for fragmentation of the carbon backbone was determined. Backbone fragmentation of pristine pyrene ions (C$_{16}$H$_{10}^+$) requires absorption of three photons of energy just below 3 eV, whereas super-hydrogenated hexahydropyrene (C$_{16}$H$_{16}^+$) must absorb two such photons and fully hydrogenated hexadecahydropyrene (C$_{16}$H$_{26}^+$) only a single photon. These results are consistent with previously reported dissociation energies for these ions. Our experiments clearly demonstrate that the increased heat capacity from the additional hydrogen atoms does not compensate for the weakening of the carbon backbone when pyrene is hydrogenated. In photodissociation regions, super-hydrogenated Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been proposed to serve as catalysts for H$_2$-formation. Our results indicate that carbon backbone fragmentation may be a serious competitor to H$_2$-formation at least for small hydrogenated PAHs like pyrene.

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M. Wolf, H. Kiefer, J. Langeland, et. al.
Thu, 15 Sep 16
14/56

Comments: 6 pages, 4 figures, accepted in The Astrophysical Journal